Posts Tagged ‘Home’

I know I have been remiss in writing over the last couple of months.  Lots has happened which has forced me to stay very busy!

I was finally released from my home confinement on November 27th, but not without complications and a lot of work on my part.  One would think that you will be released from you ankle bracelet on the day designated by your probation officer when they first put it on.  Well, not with the probation officer I had.

About a week prior to my designated date I sent an email to my probation officer in order to confirm his availability to remove my ankle bracelet on the designated day (it was the day before Thanksgiving).  Needless to say I did not hear from him.  Two days later, still no response.  This time I opted to call him and leave a voicemail, again, no response.  I then just left it along until November 27th.  Yeah, probably should not have waited. (more…)

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120119_doj_logo_ap_328I know it has been a while since I’ve written to this blog, but my situation continues to get stranger and stranger.

While I’m still on Home Confinement I just don’t know what is going on. I’ve been told three times that I would have an opportunity to get off early.  However, I’m stuck in a world that just doesn’t make any sense. I was prosecuted out of one jurisdiction, but live in another (a good 800 miles away).  During my sentencing the judge instructed that my case be transferred to my residential area and all post incarceration matters would be handled there.

Here is where the problems come in. While the transcript of the sentencing states it was to be transferred the documented copies of the sentencing says it is recommended and authorized for transfer. This has created many problems; even prior to my release. Because my case was in a different jurisdiction, the case managers at the Atlanta USP had to get a waiver for my probation to be held in my place of residence. This created many delays; which included the inspection of my home for release. My original jurisdiction was required to authorize a “proxy” probation officer. While I was technically under my local area, all information was to be provided to the prosecuting area. (more…)

Everyone in prison has someone on the outside waiting for them to get out.  For some they are children, wives, or girlfriends.  For others, it is their parents or other family members.

Life on the “inside” is often determined by interactions between these people and the inmates.  Believe it or not inmates get very upset when they don’t hear from their children, don’t get an email on a regular basis, or don’t hear from anyone.  An inmate’s life is all dependent on the sense of hope that those on the outside will love and remember them despite the issue of them being in prison. (more…)